The Indie Authors’ Guild, or Cat Herding For Fun & Profit

Like thousands, or maybe even millions, of others, I received an email from Amazon explaining their side of their dispute with book publisher Hachette this morning. In it, Amazon tells us they’ve set up a website called ReadersUnited.com (I imagine in response to the “Authors United” group, championed by Douglas Preston, et al) and ended with a call to action of emailing the CEO of Hachette to voice our opinions regarding ebook pricing and two or three other issues.

I have my views about this dispute and have posted them here in the past, but I’m not going to talk about this latest salvo in the Amazon vs. Hachette heavyweight bout. More accomplished pundits than I will hash it out in blogs and forums over the coming days. And I have no doubt that you are capable of forming your own opinion regarding this latest letter and the dispute overall.

No, I wish to expound on an observation I made while reading initial reactions to this letter over the last couple of hours. (Time I probably should have spent outlining the back half of my next book, but the Internet is soooo SHINY!)

Until now, this debate has largely fallen along “party” lines. Established, traditional authors (like Preston, Patterson, and the signatories of the Authors United letter) have tended to side with Hachette, while the Indie rabble rousers (Konrath, Howey, and many others, who forged their own letter at Change.org) have tended to side with Amazon. On first blush, one might assume the Indie author group would, by and large, embrace this latest tactic of Amazon’s to reach out for support from the Kindle community.

That reasonable assumption, however, would be dead wrong.

In perusing my Facebook author groups, a blog post from the Passive Voice, and the first ten pages of comments from the Writers’ Cafe thread about this on the Kindle Boards, I saw a surprising diversity of reactions from my peers. On display were everything from abject apathy, to disgust, to disappointment, to unabashed outrage. Mixed in with these were also voices of support, both modest and wholehearted. After recovering from my initial shock at the huge range of opinions and emotions on display, my thoughts turned to another subject which has been bandied about in these same forums over the past several weeks and months: that of an Indie Authors’ Guild.

An organization calling itself the Authors’ Guild has been in existence for over 100 years, yet it is anything but what its title purports it to be. Often, it has been a mouthpiece for publishers, rather than authors, and is arguably more selective in its membership than the Augusta National Golf Club. Many Indie authors have expressed a desire for either the current Authors’ Guild to reform and allow Indies membership, or to create a new organization which is Indie friendly. Such an organization might provide legal advice, help in finding independent contractors for things like editing, cover design, etc., and be an advocate for the thousands of Indie authors if companies like Amazon or Barnes & Noble ever changed the terms of their distribution agreements to be less than favorable. All of these sound like laudable and worthwhile objectives.

Yet, I feel it’s workable in ideal only. After seeing the multitude of reactions today to Amazon’s plea — a company that has almost single-handedly given writers an opportunity to make money doing something they love and many never thought possible — how on Earth can anyone expect this diverse, opinionated group to come together to form a cohesive guild, union, or treehouse club? There’s not enough money in the world to pay someone to head up such an organization. You’d have more success herding ten thousand cats without the use of milk, tuna, or catnip. Every decision would be lambasted by some, lauded by others, and greeted with disinterest by still more.

I do think a directory listing site for those contracted services, along with some educational help for those new to self publishing, is doable for someone willing to put in the work to gather up that information, but I just can’t see a unified voice ever coming about for a group who, by definition, are a bunch of free-wheeling mavericks who march to the beat of their own drums.

What do you think? Is establishing a cohesive Indie Authors’ Guild an achievable goal? How would you go about it? I’d love to hear your thoughts.

Advertisements

About Alan Tucker

Writer, Dad, Graphic Designer, Soccer Coach … not necessarily in that order!

Posted on August 9, 2014, in Books/Writing, Random/Rants and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. I think creative people as a rule are hard to herd. I would not be surprised to hear that Hachette has its own headaches with authors.

  2. I imagine so, although they have agents to shield them in most cases. Thanks for your input!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: